Category Archives: Green Card Blog Posts

Green Card Priority Date Movement for June 2016


Use Chart A. Final Action Date for June 2016

The Visa Bulletin will now have two different charts because of the revised procedures. DOS will post two charts per visa preference category in the DOS Visa Bulletin. The charts are:

  • Application Final Action Dates (dates when visas may finally be issued); and
  • Dates for Filing Applications (earliest dates when applicants may be able to apply).

When USCIS determines there are immigrant visas available for the filing of additional adjustment of status applications, the B. Adjustment Application Filing Dates chart may be used to determine when to file an adjustment of status application with USCIS.  Otherwise, the A. Visa Processing Dates chart must be used to determine when to file an adjustment of status application with USCIS. USCIS will determine which chart is effective for the following month approximately one week after DOS publishes the Visa Bulletin.

A. Visa Processing Dates (Final Action Dates for EB Categories)

Final Action

Movement Since May 2016

  • EB2 China — Sep 1, 2012 to Jan 1, 2010 (Retrogress 974 days or 2 years and 8 months)

    EB2 India — Nov 8, 2008 Oct 1, 2004 (Retrogress 1499 days or 4 years, 1 month and 7 days)

  • EB3 All — Feb 15, 2016 (No Change)

  • EB3 China — Aug 15, 2013 to Jan 1, 2010 (Retrogress 1322 days or 3 years, 7 months and 14 days)

  • EB3 El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras — Feb 15, 2016 (No Change)

  • EB3 India — Sep 1, 2004 to Sep 22, 2004 (21 days)

  • EB3 Mexico — Feb 15, 2016 (No Change)

  • EB3 Philippines — Aug 8, 2008 to Nov 1, 2008 (85 days)

  • EB5 China Non-RC — Feb 8, 2014 to Feb 15, 2005 (7 days)

    EB5 China RC — Feb 8, 2014 to Feb 15, 2004 (7 days)

B. Adjustment Application Filing Dates (Filing of EB Applications)

Filing Date

Movement Since May 2016

  • EB2 China — Jun 1, 2013 (No Change)

  • EB2 India — Jul 1, 2009 (No Change)

  • EB3 All — Current

  • EB3 China — May 1, 2015 (No Chang)

  • EB3 India — Jul 1, 2005 (No Change)

  • EB3 Mexico — Current

  • EB3 Philippines — Jan 1, 2010 (No Change)

  • EB5 China Non-RC — May 1, 2015 (No Change)

  • EB5 China RC — May 1, 2015 (No Change)

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Green Card Priority Date Movement for May 2016


Use Chart A. Final Action Date for May 2016

The Visa Bulletin will now have two different charts because of the revised procedures. DOS will post two charts per visa preference category in the DOS Visa Bulletin. The charts are:

  • Application Final Action Dates (dates when visas may finally be issued); and
  • Dates for Filing Applications (earliest dates when applicants may be able to apply).

When USCIS determines there are immigrant visas available for the filing of additional adjustment of status applications, the B. Adjustment Application Filing Dates chart may be used to determine when to file an adjustment of status application with USCIS.  Otherwise, the A. Visa Processing Dates chart must be used to determine when to file an adjustment of status application with USCIS. USCIS will determine which chart is effective for the following month approximately one week after DOS publishes the Visa Bulletin.

A. Visa Processing Dates (Final Action Dates for EB Categories)

Final Action

Movement Since April 2016

  • EB2 China — Sep 1, 2012 (No Change)

    EB2 India — Nov 8, 2008 (No Change)

  • EB3 All — Feb 15, 2016 (No Change)

  • EB3 China — Aug 15, 2013 (No Change)

  • EB3 El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras — Feb 15, 2016 (New Category)

  • EB3 India — Aug 8, 2004 to Sep 1, 2004 (24 days)

  • EB3 Mexico — Feb 15, 2016 (No Change)

  • EB3 Philippines — May 1, 2008 to Aug 8, 2008 (92 days)

  • EB5 China Non-RC — Feb 1, 2014 to Feb 8, 2014 (7 days)

    EB5 China RC — Feb 1, 2014 to Feb 8, 2014 (7 days)

B. Adjustment Application Filing Dates (Filing of EB Applications)

Filing Date

Movement Since April 2016

  • EB2 China — Jun 1, 2013 (No Change)

  • EB2 India — Jul 1, 2009 (No Change)

  • EB3 All — Current

  • EB3 China — May 1, 2015 (No Chang)

  • EB3 India — Jul 1, 2005 (No Change)

  • EB3 Mexico — Current

  • EB3 Philippines — Jan 1, 2010 (No Change)

  • EB5 China Non-RC — May 1, 2015 (No Change)

  • EB5 China RC — May 1, 2015 (No Change)

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Green Card Priority Date Movement for March 2016


The Visa Bulletin will now have two different charts because of the revised procedures. DOS will post two charts per visa preference category in the DOS Visa Bulletin. The charts are:

  • Application Final Action Dates (dates when visas may finally be issued); and
  • Dates for Filing Applications (earliest dates when applicants may be able to apply).

When USCIS determines there are immigrant visas available for the filing of additional adjustment of status applications, the B. Adjustment Application Filing Dates chart may be used to determine when to file an adjustment of status application with USCIS.  Otherwise, the A. Visa Processing Dates chart must be used to determine when to file an adjustment of status application with USCIS. USCIS will determine which chart is effective for the following month approximately one week after DOS publishes the Visa Bulletin.

A. Visa Processing Dates (Final Action Dates for EB Categories)

Final Action

Movement Since February 2016

  • EB2 China — Mar 1, 2012 to Aug 1, 2012 (153 days)

  • EB2 India — Aug 1, 2008 to Oct 15, 2008 (75 days)

  • EB3 All — Oct 1, 2015 to Jan 1, 2016 (92 days)

  • EB3 China — Oct 1, 2012 to Jun 1, 2013 (243 days)

  • EB3 India — Jun 15, 2004 to Jul 15, 2004(30 days)

  • EB3 Mexico — Oct 1, 2015 to Jan 1, 2016 (92 days)

  • EB3 Philippines — Jan 1, 2008 to Mar 15, 2008 (74 days)

  • EB5 China Non-RC — Jan 15, 2014 to Jan 22, 2014 (7 days)

  • EB5 China RC — Jan 15, 2014 to Jan 22, 2014 (7 days)

B. Adjustment Application Filing Dates (Filing of EB Applications)

Filing Date

Movement Since February 2016

  • EB2 China — Jan 1, 2013 (No Change)

  • EB2 India — Jul 1, 2009 (No Change)

  • EB3 All — Jan 1, 2016 to Current

  • EB3 China — Oct 1, 2013 to May 1, 2015 (1 year, 7 months or 577 days)

  • EB3 India — Jul 1, 2005 (No Change)

  • EB3 Mexico — Jan 1, 2016 to Current

  • EB3 Philippines — Jan 1, 2010 (No Change)

  • EB5 China Non-RC — May 1, 2015 (No Change)

  • EB5 China RC — May 1, 2015 (No Change)

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Summary of Proposed I-140 Program Improvement Rule


On December 31, 2015, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) published to the Federal Register for public comment the Retention of EB-1, EB-2, and EB-3 Immigrant Workers and Program Improvements Affecting High-Skilled Nonimmigrant Workers. The intended purpose of the rule change is to streamline the processes for employer sponsorship of nonimmigrant workers for a green card (lawful permanent resident (LPR) status), increase job portability and otherwise provide stability and flexibility for such workers, and provide additional transparency and consistency in the application of agency policies and procedures related to these programs. On the employer side, the intent is to improve their ability to employ and retain high-skilled workers with approved employment-based immigrant visa petitions (I-140). On the employee side, the intent is to increase the ability for those workers in the green card queue to further their careers by accepting promotions, changing positions with current employers, changing employers, and pursuing other employment opportunities.

First, the proposed rule seeks to clarify and improve policies and practices related to:

  • The ability of H-1B nonimmigrant workers who are being sponsored for lawful permanent residence (and their dependents in H-4 nonimmigrant status) to extend their nonimmigrant status beyond the otherwise-applicable 6-year limit pursuant to AC21.
  • The ability of certain workers who have pending applications for adjustment of status to change employers or jobs without endangering the approved employment-based immigrant visa petitions filed on their behalf.
  • The ability of H-1B nonimmigrant workers to change jobs or employers, including: (1) The ability to begin employment with new H-1B employers that have filed non-frivolous petitions for new H-1B employment; and (2) the ability of H-1B employers to file successive H-1B portability petitions (often referred to as “bridge petitions”) and how these petitions affect lawful status and work authorization.
  • The way in which H-1B nonimmigrant workers are counted against the annual H-1B numerical cap, including: (1) The method for calculating when such workers may access so-called “remainder time” (i.e., time when they were physically outside the United States), thus allowing them to use their full period of H-1B status; and (2) the method for determining which H-1B nonimmigrant workers are “cap-exempt” as a result of previously being counted against the cap.
  • The method for determining which H-1B nonimmigrant workers are exempt from the H-1B numerical cap due to their employment with an institution of higher education, a nonprofit entity related to or affiliated with such an institution, or a governmental or nonprofit research organization, including a revision to the definition of the term “related or affiliated nonprofit entity” for such purposes.
  • The ability of H-1B nonimmigrant workers who are disclosing information in aid of, or otherwise participating in, investigations regarding alleged violations of Labor Condition Application obligations in the H-1B program to provide documentary evidence to USCIS to demonstrate that their resulting failure to maintain H-1B status was due to “extraordinary circumstances.”

Second, the proposed rule seeks to enhance the stability and flexibility of the program by making the following changes:

  • Retention of employment-based immigrant visa petitions. DHS proposes to enhance job portability for certain workers who have approved immigrant visa petitions in the employment-based first preference (EB-1), second preference (EB-2), and third preference (EB-3) categories but who are unable to obtain those visas in the foreseeable future due to significant immigrant visa backlogs. Specifically, DHS proposes to amend its automatic revocation regulations so that immigrant visa petitions that have been approved for 180 days or more would no longer be subject to automatic revocation based solely on withdrawal by the petitioner or termination of the petitioner’s business. As long as the petition approval has not been revoked for fraud, material misrepresentation, the invalidation or revocation of a labor certification, or USCIS error, the petition will generally continue to be valid to the beneficiary for various job portability and status extension purposes under the immigration laws. Such a beneficiary, however, must obtain a new job offer and may need another immigrant visa petition approved on his or her behalf to ultimately obtain status as an LPR.
  • Retention of priority dates. DHS proposes to further enhance job portability for workers with approved EB-1, EB-2, and EB-3 immigrant visa petitions by providing greater clarity regarding when they may retain the priority dates assigned to those petitions and effectively transfer those dates to new and subsequently approved employment-based immigrant visa petitions. As with the immediately preceding provision, priority date retention generally would be available so long as the initial immigrant visa petition was approved and this approval has not been revoked for fraud, material misrepresentation, the invalidation or revocation of a labor certification, or USCIS error. This provision would improve the ability of certain workers to accept promotions, change employers, or accept other employment opportunities without fear of losing their place in line for immigrant visas based on the skills they contribute to the U.S. economy.
  • Nonimmigrant grace periods. To enhance job portability for certain high-skilled nonimmigrants, DHS proposes to generally establish a one-time grace period, during an authorized validity period, of up to 60 days whenever employment ends for individuals holding E-1, E-2, E-3, H-1B, H-1B1, L-1, or TN nonimmigrant status. This proposal would allow these high-skilled workers to more readily pursue new employment should they be eligible for other employer-sponsored nonimmigrant classifications or for the same classification with a new employer. Conversely, the proposal allows U.S. employers to more easily facilitate changes in employment for existing or newly recruited nonimmigrant workers. The individual may not work during the grace period, unless otherwise authorized by regulation. As needed, DHS in its discretion may eliminate or shorten the 60-day period on a case-by-case basis.
  • Eligibility for employment authorization in compelling circumstances. DHS also proposes to provide additional stability and flexibility to certain high-skilled nonimmigrant workers in the United States who are the beneficiaries of approved employment-based immigrant visa petitions but who cannot obtain an immigrant visa number due to statutory limits on immigrant visa issuance and are experiencing compelling circumstances. Specifically, DHS proposes to allow such beneficiaries in the United States on E-3, H-1B, H-1B1, L-1, or O-1 nonimmigrant status to apply for separate employment authorization for a limited period if there are compelling circumstances that, in the discretionary determination of DHS, justify the consideration of such employment authorization.
  • H-1B licensing. DHS proposes to clarify exceptions to the requirement that make approval of an H-1B petition contingent upon licensure where such licensure is required to fully perform the duties of the specialty occupation. The proposed rule would generally allow a petitioning employer that has filed an H-1B petition for an unlicensed worker to meet the licensure requirement by demonstrating that the worker has filed a request for such license but is unable to obtain it, or is unable to file a request for such a license, because a state or locality requires a social security number or the issuance of employment authorization before accepting or approving such requests. The proposed rule also clarifies that DHS may approve an H-1B petition on behalf of an unlicensed worker if he or she will work in a State that allows such individuals to be employed in the occupation under the supervision of licensed senior or supervisory personnel.

Finally, the proposed rule seeks to provide stability for individuals eligible for Employment Authorization Documents by automatically extending the validity in certain circumstances and by eliminating the regulatory provisions that require adjudication within 90 days of filing and that authorize interim EAD cards.

The proposed rule has been allotted 60 days for public comment. We intend to provide a detailed outline of the rule in the coming weeks that will break down the expected changes in plain English.

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Green Card Priority Date Movement for February 2016


The Visa Bulletin will now have two different charts because of the revised procedures. DOS will post two charts per visa preference category in the DOS Visa Bulletin. The charts are:

  • Application Final Action Dates (dates when visas may finally be issued); and
  • Dates for Filing Applications (earliest dates when applicants may be able to apply).

When USCIS determines there are immigrant visas available for the filing of additional adjustment of status applications, the B. Adjustment Application Filing Dates chart may be used to determine when to file an adjustment of status application with USCIS.  Otherwise, the A. Visa Processing Dates chart must be used to determine when to file an adjustment of status application with USCIS. USCIS will determine which chart is effective for the following month approximately one week after DOS publishes the Visa Bulletin.

A. Visa Processing Dates (Final Action Dates for EB Categories)

Final Action

Movement Since January 2016

  • EB2 China — Feb 1, 2012 to Mar 1, 2012 (29 days)

  • EB2 India — Feb 1, 2008 to Aug 1, 2008 (182 days)

  • EB3 All — Oct 1, 2015  (no change)

  • EB3 China — Jul 1, 2012 to Oct 1, 2012 (92 days)

  • EB3 India — May 15, 2004 to Jun 15, 2004 (31 days)

  • EB3 Mexico — Oct 1, 2015 (no change)

  • EB3 Philippines — Nov 1, 2007 to Jan 1, 2008 (61 days)

  • EB5 China Non-RC — Jan 8, 2014 to Jan 15, 2014 (7 days)

  • EB5 China RC — Jan 8, 2014 to Jan 15, 2014 (7 days)

B. Adjustment Application Filing Dates (Filing of EB Applications)

Filing Date

Movement Since January 2016

  • EB2 China — Jan 1, 2013 (No Change)

  • EB2 India — Jul 1, 2009 (No Change)

  • EB3 All — Jan 1, 2016 (No Change)

  • EB3 China — Oct 1, 2013 (No Change)

  • EB3 India — Jul 1, 2005 (No Change)

  • EB3 Mexico — Jan 1, 2016 (No Change)

  • EB3 Philippines — Jan 1, 2010 (No Change)

  • EB5 China Non-RC — May 1, 2015 (No Change)

  • EB5 China RC — May 1, 2015 (No Change)

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Green Card Priority Date Movement for January 2016


The Visa Bulletin will now have two different charts because of the revised procedures. DOS will post two charts per visa preference category in the DOS Visa Bulletin. The charts are:

  • Application Final Action Dates (dates when visas may finally be issued); and
  • Dates for Filing Applications (earliest dates when applicants may be able to apply).

When USCIS determines there are immigrant visas available for the filing of additional adjustment of status applications, the B. Adjustment Application Filing Dates chart may be used to determine when to file an adjustment of status application with USCIS.  Otherwise, the A. Visa Processing Dates chart must be used to determine when to file an adjustment of status application with USCIS. USCIS will determine which chart is effective for the following month approximately one week after DOS publishes the Visa Bulletin.

A. Visa Processing Dates (Final Action Dates for EB Categories)

Final Action

Movement Since December 2015

  • EB2 China — Feb 1, 2012 (No Change)

  • EB2 India — Jun 1, 2007 to Feb 1, 2008 (245 days)

  • EB3 All — Sep 1, 2015 to Oct 1, 2015  (30 days)

  • EB3 China — Apr 15, 2012 to Jul 1, 2012 (77 days)

  • EB3 India — Apr 22, 2004 to May 15, 2004 (23 days)

  • EB3 Mexico — Sep 1, 2015 to Oct 1, 2015 (30 days)

  • EB3 Philippines — Aug 1, 2007 to Nov 1, 2007 (71 days)

  • EB5 China Non-RC — Dec 15, 2013 to Jan 8, 2014 (24 days)

B. Adjustment Application Filing Dates (Filing of EB Applications)

Filing Date

Movement Since December 2015

  • EB2 China — Jan 1, 2013 (No Change)

  • EB2 India — Jul 1, 2009 (No Change)

  • EB3 All — Sep 1, 2015 to Jan 1, 2016 (122 days)

  • EB3 China — Oct 1, 2013 (No Change)

  • EB3 India — Jul 1, 2005 (No Change)

  • EB3 Mexico — Sep 1, 2015 to Jan 1, 2016 (122 days)

  • EB3 Philippines — Jan 1, 2010 (No Change)

  • EB5 China Non-RC — May 1, 2015 (No Change)

  • EB5 China RC — May 1, 2015 (No Change)

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Proposed Rule to Improve Employment-Based Immigration


Last week the Department of Homeland Security proposed to amend regulations affecting certain employment-based immigrant and nonimmigrant classifications in what has been named, “Retention of EB-1, EB-2, and EB-3 Immigrant Workers and Program Improvements Affecting Highly-Skilled H-1B Alien Workers” (RIN:1615-AC05)  While the details of this proposed rule have yet to be disclosed, the stated purpose is to amend current regulations to provide stability and job flexibility for the beneficiaries of approved employment-based immigrant visa petitions (I-140) while they wait to become lawful permanent residents.

These amendments would support U.S. employers by better enabling them to hire and retain highly-skilled foreign workers. DHS proposes to accomplish this, in part, by implementing certain provisions of ACWIA and AC21, as amended by the 21st Century DOJ Appropriations Act. The proposed amendments would increase the incentive of highly-skilled and other foreign workers who have begun the immigration process to remain in and contribute to the U.S. economy as they complete the process to adjust status to or otherwise acquire lawful permanent resident status, thereby minimizing disruptions to petitioning U.S. employers.

Attracting and retaining highly-skilled persons is important when considering their contributions to the U.S. economy, including advances in entrepreneurial and research and development endeavors, which are highly correlated with overall economic growth and job creation.

After the proposed rule has been vetted by the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, Office of Management and Budget, it will be published to the Federal Register for a period of 30 days for public comment. At that time, we will be able to provide more details about the regulation changes.

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Green Card Priority Date Movement for December 2015


The Visa Bulletin will now have two different charts because of the revised procedures. DOS will post two charts per visa preference category in the DOS Visa Bulletin. The charts are:

  • Application Final Action Dates (dates when visas may finally be issued); and
  • Dates for Filing Applications (earliest dates when applicants may be able to apply).

When USCIS determines there are immigrant visas available for the filing of additional adjustment of status applications, the B. Adjustment Application Filing Dates chart may be used to determine when to file an adjustment of status application with USCIS.  Otherwise, the A. Visa Processing Dates chart must be used to determine when to file an adjustment of status application with USCIS. USCIS will determine which chart is effective for the following month approximately one week after DOS publishes the Visa Bulletin.

A. Visa Processing Dates (Final Action Dates for EB Categories)

Final Action

Movement Since November 2015

  • EB2 China — Feb 1, 2012 (No Change)

  • EB2 India — Aug 1, 2006 to Jun 1, 2007 (304 days)

  • EB3 All — Aug 15, 2015 to Sep 1, 2015 (17 days)

  • EB3 China — Jan 1, 2012 to Apr 15, 2012 (105 days)

  • EB3 India — Apr 1, 2004 to Apr 22, 2004 (21 days)

  • EB3 Mexico — Aug 15, 2015 to Sep 1, 2015 (17 days)

  • EB3 Philippines — Jun 15, 2007 to Aug 1, 2007 (15 days)

  • EB5 China Non-RC — Nov 22, 2013 to Dec 15, 2013 (23 days)

  • EB5 China RC — Nov 22, 2013 to Dec 15, 2013 (23 days)

B. Adjustment Application Filing Dates (Filing of EB Applications)

Filing Date

  • EB2 China — Jan 1, 2013 (No Change)

  • EB2 India — Jul 1, 2009 (No Change)

  • EB3 All — Sep 1, 2015 (No Change)

  • EB3 China — Oct 1, 2013 (No Change)

  • EB3 India — Jul 1, 2005 (No Change)

  • EB3 Mexico — Sep 1, 2015 (No Change)

  • EB3 Philippines — Jan 1, 2010 (No Change)

  • EB5 China Non-RC — May 1, 2015 (No Change)

  • EB5 China RC — May 1, 2015 (No Change)

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Green Card Priority Date Movement for November 2015


The Visa Bulletin will now have two different charts because of the revised procedures. DOS will post two charts per visa preference category in the DOS Visa Bulletin. The charts are:

  • Application Final Action Dates (dates when visas may finally be issued); and
  • Dates for Filing Applications (earliest dates when applicants may be able to apply).

When USCIS determines there are immigrant visas available for the filing of additional adjustment of status applications, the B. Adjustment Application Filing Dates chart may be used to determine when to file an adjustment of status application with USCIS.  Otherwise, the A. Visa Processing Dates chart must be used to determine when to file an adjustment of status application with USCIS. USCIS will determine which chart is effective for the following month approximately one week after DOS publishes the Visa Bulletin.

A. Visa Processing Dates (Final Action Dates for EB Categories)

Final Action

Movement Since September 2015

  • EB2 China — Jan 1, 2012 to Feb 1, 2012 (31 days)

  • EB2 India — May 1, 2005 to Aug 1, 2006 (457 days or 1 year, 3 months)

  • EB3 All — Aug 15, 2015 (No Change)

  • EB3 China — Oct 15, 2011 to Jan 1, 2012 (78 days)

  • EB3 India — Mar 8, 2004 to Apr 1, 2004 (24 days)

  • EB3 Mexico — Aug 15, 2015 (No Change)

  • EB3 Philippines — Jan 1, 2007 to Jun 15, 2007 (165 days or 5 months, 14 days)

  • EB5 China Non-RC — Oct 8, 2013 to Nov 22, 2013 (45 days)

  • EB5 China RC — Oct 8, 2013 to Nov 22, 2013 (45 days)

B. Adjustment Application Filing Dates (Filing of EB Applications)

Filing Date

  • EB2 China — Jan 1, 2013 (No Change)

  • EB2 India — Jul 1, 2009 (No Change)

  • EB3 All — Sep 1, 2015 (No Change)

  • EB3 China — Oct 1, 2013 (No Change)

  • EB3 India — Jul 1, 2005 (No Change)

  • EB3 Mexico — Sep 1, 2015 (No Change)

  • EB3 Philippines — Jan 1, 2010 (No Change)

  • EB5 China Non-RC — May 1, 2015 (No Change)

  • EB5 China RC — May 1, 2015 (No Change)

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Advocates Request Reinstatement of Original October Visa Bulletin


As a result of the Department of State’s eleventh hour revision of the October 2015 Visa Bulletin and the Department of Homeland Security’s refusal to accept adjustment of status applications, immigrants who have been waiting years for the right to file to become a lawful permanent resident were dealt a detrimental blow. Most significant was the ability for tens of thousands of high skilled foreign professionals with approved immigrant petitions to file an adjustment of status application. This would place them in the green card queue. More than just being approved to file the adjustment application, they would actually be waiting for the green card to be issued.

Simply by filing these adjustment of status, however, these immigrants would not only be granted the right to pursue self-employment through entrepreneurism, but more importantly, to change jobs within a company or to seek opportunities with new employers. For those who have begin the employment-based green card process, they become linked to the employer that filed the immigrant petition. They also become linked to the exact position for which the immigrant petition was based. The current system can be equated to indentured servitude because the immigrant must stay with that employer or face great uncertainty in immigration status.

The immigrant must stay in the same or similar position as the position for which the immigrant petition is based. If they choose to change jobs, they also choose to start the green card process over with the new employer. If the next employer does not agree to sponsor them for the immigrant petition, they face losing status in the U.S. and being forced to leave the country. The result is that the U.S. becomes even less competitive in the global economy and in the fight to obtain top talent.

Advocates for immigration, as well as major U.S. business, did not stand idly by as the DoS and DHS. On October 4, 2015, numerous employers and advocates sent a letter to Secretary of State, John Kerry, Secretary of Homeland Security, Jeh Johnson, and Assistant to the President and Director of the Domestic Policy Counsel, Cecilia Munoz, demanding reinstatement of the October 2015 Visa Bulletin published on September 9, 2015. Click here to read the full text of the October 4, 2015 Letter. With any luck, the receivers of the letter will be swayed by the strong arguments put forth by these advocates, and they will reinstate the visa bulletin that will allow tens of thousands of highly-skilled professionals provide even greater contributions to the U.S. economy.

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